1930s

  • Helen Maulsby Redfern, J39, J68P, on May 23, 2016, at age ninety-seven in Amelia Island, FL. A member of a distinguished Tufts family, her grandfather was David Lee Maulsby, an 1887 graduate who went on to chair the English department. She was the daughter of William S. Maulsby, a 1912 alumnus, and Jane Rextrow Maulsby, a 1910 graduate of Jackson College. Her uncle, Francis A. Maulsby, graduated in 1914. Her daughter, Jane Redfern Scanlan, J68, was a Tufts trustee. Contributions may be made to the David Lee Maulsby Memorial Scholarship at Tufts.

1940s

  • Harry Briggs Jr., A42, who was known as Northwestern State University’s “Paddlin’ Professor” for his long-distance swimming exploits around the world, on June 25, 2016, at age ninety-five. Briggs, an adjunct political science professor at NSU’s Leesville/Fort Polk campus, was inducted into the International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame in 1997. A former Marine who served in the Pacific during World War II, he achieved notoriety for his marathon swimming in the Fifties and Sixties. He was profiled in the New York Times and Sports Illustrated and appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show. Briggs, who completed more than forty marathon swims over the course of his career, was the first to swim across Lake Erie, in 1957, when he paddled thirty-two miles from Ohio to Ontario in thirty-five hours and fifty-five minutes. He was also the first to swim from Corsica to Sardinia and across Lake Winnipesaukee in New Hampshire. 

     

  • George Paul Dabrowski, A47, on February 10, 2016, at age eighty-nine. He attended Tufts as part of the U.S. Navy’s V-12 training program and later joined the Navy Reserve, serving during the Korean War. After being discharged, he joined C. Lloyd Johnson Company, where he built a career in sales management. In 1959, he married Mary Mroz, and they enjoyed traveling the world, playing bridge, gardening, and supporting the local arts community. In addition to his wife, he leaves five children and six grandchildren. 

     

  • F. Haydn Williams, F47, F58, on April 27, 2016, at age ninety-six. As a Navy officer during World War II, he participated in air evacuations of U.S. prisoners of war. He graduated from the University of California, Berkeley in 1946 and held teaching and administrative positions at the Fletcher School before serving as deputy assistant secretary of defense for national and international security from 1958 to 1962. He was the president of the Asia Foundation, a San Francisco-based organization that provides international development support. In the 1970s, he served as U.S. ambassador for the Micronesian-Marianas Future Political Status Negotiations. In 1994, President Clinton appointed Williams to the American Battle Monuments Commission, and as chair of its National World War II Memorial Committee, he led the efforts to procure a site and gain approval for the memorial’s design. Predeceased by his wife of forty-three years, the former Margaret French, he is survived by a stepson and a sister.

     

  • Melvin S. Heller, A43, M48, G48, J79P, of Haverford, PA, on January 12, 2016, at age ninety-three. A prominent psychiatrist, psychoanalyst, and professor of psychiatry at Temple University School of Medicine, Heller was a pioneer in the field of forensic psychiatry and cofounded Temple’s unit in law and psychiatry. He also served as a consultant to the ABC television network’s Department of Standards and Practices on depictions of violence and sexuality. He was the author of many books, journal articles in medicine and psychiatry, and two volumes of memoirs. Predeceased by his wife, Irmgard Heller, he is survived by three children, six grandchildren, and a great-grandchild.

     

  • Bruce A. MacDonald, A43, on March 6, 2016. He served with the U.S. Navy during World War II aboard the USS Sederstrom. He is survived by two sons, a stepson, and many grandchildren. 

     

  • Rebecca “Becky” Moore Robinson, J44, of Winchester, MA, on April 29, 2016, at age ninety-three. A member of Alpha Xi Delta at Tufts, she worked for many years at Winchester National Bank and Winchester Savings Bank. A dedicated volunteer, she was a Brownie and Girl Scout leader, PTA treasurer and vice president, a member of the Winchester Unitarian Society, and fifty-year member of the Winchester En Ka Society. She is survived by her daughter, son, four grandchildren, and eight great-grandchildren.

     

  • Albert Edwin Sears, A49, of New Harbor, ME, on June 13, 2016. He completed one semester at Tufts before being called to active duty, but was discharged in time to return to college in the fall of 1946; he was a member of Delta Upsilon fraternity. Later, after reenlisting in the Navy, he served as a staff communications officer, notably at Bikini Atoll during the 1954 atomic bomb tests. For twenty-seven years he worked in the Bell System at the Chesapeake and Potomac (C&P) Telephone Companies. In 1963, he was named a public affairs fellow at the Brookings Institute. In 1968, he was appointed an assistant vice president and head of the Department of Labor Relations of four C&P companies. He is survived by his sister, three nephews, and four nieces.

  • Frank L. Shoring, A40, of West Hartford, CT, on January 20, 2016. He was a veteran of World War II, with twenty-six combat missions over Germany. In 1945, he joined Columbian National Life in Boston, where he worked until retiring in 1970. He later became executive director of the Hartford chapter of Chartered Life Underwriters and executive director of the Estate and Business Planning Council of Hartford. He was an adjunct faculty member at Boston University, a trustee and fundraising adviser to the Greater Hartford Easter Seal Rehabilitation Center, and a member of and fundraising adviser to the Connecticut Children’s Medical Center board of governors. He served as president of the Connecticut Tufts Alliance. Predeceased by his wife Marion, Shoring is survived by his son, daughter, and granddaughter. 

  • John Yannacakis, A49, on March 5, 2016.

     

1950s

  • Melvin Merken, A50, G51, A81P, professor emeritus of chemistry at Worcester State University, on November 4, 2015. He enlisted in the Army on his seventeenth birthday and received the Army of Occupation Medal, the Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal, the Good Conduct Medal, the World War II Victory Medal, and the Meritorious Unit Service Plaque. He joined Worcester State in 1958 as an instructor in the physical sciences and advanced through the ranks to become a full professor. His love of teaching and science are reflected in his book Physical Science with Modern Applications, which has been used by thousands of students in colleges and universities across the country. He received a Distinguished Service Award from Worcester State three times, the Commonwealth Citation for Outstanding Performance twice, and the Educator of the Year Award from the central Massachusetts chapter of Phi Delta Kappa. He was a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Institute of Chemists, and a member emeritus of the American Chemical Society. He is survived by his wife of fifty-nine years, Shirley Ann (Stahl) Merken; two sons, Stephen Merken, A81, and Aaron Merken; a daughter, Naomi; and two grandchildren.

  • Walter “Bink” K. Brinn, E54, on October 29, 2015. He served in the Navy for four years as an engineering officer on several aircraft carriers. He worked for General Electric Lighting in Cleveland, OH, and Power Transformer in Pittsfield, MA, for forty-two years. He was a strong supporter of the United Way and president of the Cleveland Association of Research Directors from 1987 to 1988. He is survived by his wife, Mary Burke Brinn, four children, and nine grandchildren. 

     

  • Dorothy J. Corwin, J55, of Westwood, NJ, on February 27, 2016. A native New Yorker, she attended Bronx High School of Science. She received her master’s degree in social work from Boston University and attended Columbia University School of Social Work. She found her true love, books, at the Westwood Public Library, where she worked for many years. She and her husband, Norman, enjoyed traveling, especially when chaperoning the Westwood High School band on their European trips. In addition to her husband, she leaves two daughters, a son, and four grandchildren.

     

  • Ellen L. Doubleday, J53, G54, of Cape Porpoise, ME, on January 22, 2016, at age eighty-four. She is survived by her husband, David, a son, and seven grandchildren.

     

  • Virginia Elsie Endriss, J52, of Venice, FL, on February 23, 2016, at age eighty-nine. She graduated from Norfolk Art School in 1947, studied at Trinity College, and privately studied with Frederick Sexton and Clarence Brodeur. She lived in Connecticut, California, and Florida, and taught art in private and public schools. She also worked for the New England Gas Company and was involved in civil service.

     

  • Judith G. Hunter, J56, on April 5, 2016. She received a master’s degree in health education from Brockport State University. She taught for many years at Rochester Children’s Nursery, Perinton Nursery School, and as a home instructor for the Rochester City School District. She was also active in the Rochester Association for the Education of Young Children. She is survived by four children, their father, Robert, and six grandchildren. 

     

  • George Kerr, A51, of Matthews, NC, on February 26, 2016. He served two years in the Air Corps and was a salesman with Ryerson Steel Company for thirty-eight years. His passion for pottery took him to Queens University, Central Piedmont Community College, and Penland School of Arts and Crafts, where he developed the unique style he called “By George.” For many years, he taught Sunday school and was a deacon at Myers Park Baptist Church; he was a lifelong student of theology and human relations. Daughters Kathy and Nancy predeceased him. He is survived by his wife, Fran, a daughter, a son, and four grandchildren.

     

  • Edward C. King, E55, of Wyoming, OH, on November 13, 2015, at age eighty-three. He worked for many years in project management at Procter & Gamble and Children’s Hospital. Predeceased by his daughter, Adrienne, he is survived by his wife of fifty-seven years, Patricia Glenn King, four children, and eight grandchildren.

     

  • Jerome Kowal, A52, the Amasa B. Ford Professor Emeritus of Geriatric Medicine at Case Western Reserve University, on December 23, 2015. He received his M.D. from Johns Hopkins University and completed his residency and endocrinology training at Mount Sinai Hospital before serving in the Air Force as a flight surgeon and pediatrician. His career as a scientist, clinician, and medical educator spanned forty years at Mount Sinai School of Medicine and Case Western Reserve University, where he trained two generations of clinicians and academic leaders. He served as chief of medicine and chief of staff at the Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center and associate dean for veteran affairs at Case Western. In 1994, he became associate dean for geriatric medicine. He is survived by his wife of fifty-seven years, Martine, two children, and nine grandchildren. 

     

  • Howard S. Lampal, A54, on December 26, 2015. He was a graduate of Chicago Medical School and did his internship and residency at Rhode Island Hospital. He practiced pediatrics for more than fifty years and was beloved by his patients and their families, some of whom were third generation. He is survived by his wife, Dorothy Bennett Lampal, two children, and six grandchildren.

     

  • Harvey Liberman, M56, of North Kingstown, RI, on May 18, 2016, at age eighty-five. He was a surgeon at Sturdy Memorial Hospital in Attleboro, MA, for more than thirty years before he retired in 1996; he also served as the hospital’s chief of surgery. He was president of the Greater Attleboro High School football team and director of medicine at MetLife Healthcare in Canton, MA, in the late Eighties. He and his wife, Anne, were members of the Wickford Yacht Club, where he was commodore in 2006. Besides his wife, he leaves two daughters and five grandchildren. 

     

  • Melvin Merken, A50, G51, A81P, professor emeritus of chemistry at Worcester State University, on November 4, 2015. He enlisted in the Army on his seventeenth birthday and received the Army of Occupation Medal, the Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal, the Good Conduct Medal, the World War II Victory Medal, and the Meritorious Unit Service Plaque. He joined Worcester State in 1958 as an instructor in the physical sciences and advanced through the ranks to become a full professor. His love of teaching and science are reflected in his book Physical Science with Modern Applications, which has been used by thousands of students in colleges and universities across the country. He received a Distinguished Service Award from Worcester State three times, the Commonwealth Citation for Outstanding Performance twice, and the Educator of the Year Award from the central Massachusetts chapter of Phi Delta Kappa. He was a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Institute of Chemists, and a member emeritus of the American Chemical Society. He is survived by his wife of fifty-nine years, Shirley Ann (Stahl) Merken; two sons, Stephen Merken, A81, and Aaron Merken; a daughter, Naomi; and two grandchildren.

  • Bruce H. Moore, E50, of St. Louis, MO, on February 6, 2016; he was eighty-six. A cum laude graduate of Tufts, he received a master’s degree in civil engineering from Purdue. He served as an Army officer in the Korean War and was with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers from 1958 to 1991. As chief of the foundation and materials branch, he was recognized for his work on the St. Louis flood walls. He was a Boy Scout, the father of two Eagle Scouts, and a dedicated volunteer with the USO at Lambert Airport. Predeceased by his son, Captain Karl H. Moore, he is survived by his wife, Susie, one son, two adopted daughters, and four grandchildren. 

     

  • Jason C. Primack, A54, on April 5, 2016; he was eighty-three. He received his law degree from George Washington University School of Law and served as a second assistant district attorney in Essex County, Massachusetts, from 1958 to 1974, and then went into private practice. He was a member of the Massachusetts, New York, and District of Columbia bar associations. He was also an instructor in criminal law at North Shore and Northern Essex Community College. He was predeceased by his wife, Marlene (Rakofsky) Primack, and is survived by a daughter, a son, and four grandchildren.

     

  • Paul L. Rossignoli, A55, on May 15, 2016. A longtime resident of North Kingstown, RI, he had a thirty-year career as a respected otolaryngologist. He was a graduate of the University of Bologna School of Medicine and did his residency at Georgetown University. He was a longtime chief of ENT at Kent Hospital before retiring in 2000. He is survived by his sister.

     

  • Mary Alice Wolf, J53, of Pittsford, NY, on March 18, 2016. A lifelong learner, she took classes for many years at the Rochester Athenaeum, where she also co-taught a course on James Joyce’s Ulysses. She was a supporter, board member, and patron of the Memorial Art Gallery, the Rochester Contemporary Arts Center, Eastman Opera, the Chatterbox Club, the Genesee Valley Club, and many other organizations. Predeceased by her husband, Bob Wolf, she is survived by two children and two grandchildren. 

     

1960s

1970s

  • Leslie Brown, J77, on August 5, 2016, at age sixty-one. She received her Ph.D. from Duke University in 1997, and taught at Duke, the University of Missouri-St. Louis, and Washington University. In 2008, she joined the faculty at Williams College, teaching a range of history courses on race, gender, and documentary studies. Her book Upbuilding Black Durham: Gender, Class and Black Community Development in the Jim Crow South won the Frederick Jackson Turner Prize for the best book in American history by a first-time author. She and her life partner, Annie Valk, co-authored Living with Jim Crow: African American Women and Memories of the Jim Crow South in 2010, which won the Oral History Association’s Biennial Book Award. In 2014, she published African American Voices from Emancipation to the Present. At the time of her death, she was completing a forthcoming edited volume, U.S. Women’s History: Untangling the Threads of Sisterhood, and working on a project on gender and migration. She is survived by her partner.

     

  • David Levintow, F70, of Lyme, NH, on February 18, 2016; he was eighty-nine. He served during World War II in the Army Air Corps and graduated from Antioch College in 1950, before earning his master’s degree in development economics from Fletcher. From 1958 to 1984, he served with the U.S. Agency for International Development as a Foreign Service officer, retiring as a career member of the Senior Foreign Service with the rank of counselor. His Washington, DC, tours included serving as director for Pakistan and Nepal and in the Bureau for Private Enterprise. He also served on the U.S. delegation to the Asian Development Bank and helped to establish the U.S. Trade and Development Agency. He later worked for the Institute for Public-Private Partnerships, the Center for Financial Engineering in Development, and the Center for Privatization. In this effort, he served as a development economist advising government officials in more than thirty countries. Predeceased by his wife, Arsenia, he is survived by a daughter, three sons, and six grandchildren 

1980s

  • Janice R. Baserga, V86, of Cumberland, ME, on July 17, 2016; she was fifty-six. She met her husband, Jeffrey Milburn, A82, V86, in veterinary school and they celebrated their thirtieth anniversary this spring as she fought pancreatic cancer. She practiced veterinary medicine at Scarborough Animal Hospital for almost thirty years. She was a devoted member of the Maine Golden Retriever Club until her final days. In addition to her husband, she is survived by two sons. 

     

  • Eduardo “Ed” O. Caveda, A84, of San Antonio, TX, on March 17, 2016. After receiving his medical degree from Boston University, Caveda joined the U.S. Army and completed his internship at Brooks Army Medical Center. He then cared for troops in Germany for three years before being stationed in Virginia until 1997. Caveda established a private primary care practice in Orange Grove, TX, and later opened a second practice in San Diego, TX. He is survived by his wife, Veronica Caveda, a daughter, three sons, a stepson, a granddaughter, his parents, and two sisters, including Monica Caveda, J89.

  • Susanne Hilgefort, J89, one of Major League Baseball’s longest-tenured employees, died in a plane crash on July 16, 2016, at age forty-eight. She began her career as a training coordinator for Christian Dior. She got into baseball in January 1994, when she was hired as manager of production and programming for the Baseball Network, then a broadcasting joint venture of MLB, ABC, and NBC. After that network dissolved, she moved to the commissioner’s office as senior manager of broadcasting, and later as senior director of distribution development. She played a key role in the launch of the MLB Network in 2009 as senior director of affiliate sales and marketing. In May 2010, she assumed the role of senior director of broadcasting business affairs. 

     

1990s

  • Lynne Sherburne Gagliano, J90, of Surrey, England, on June 27, 2016, at age forty-eight. After graduating with degrees in English and drama, she moved to England. She taught school, and earned a master’s degree in theater from the Royal Central School of Speech and Drama at the University of London. She went on to work in theater production at the Richmond Theater, the Gate, and the Royal Court Theatre. She loved reading, theater, and travel. She is survived by her husband, Stuart Sweeney, and two children.

FACULTY

  • Robert Dewald, E90P, J90P, professor of chemistry emeritus, on July 21, 2016, at age eighty. He joined the Tufts faculty as an assistant professor of chemistry in 1965 and was promoted to full professor in 1977. He led an active research program, mentored Ph.D. students, and published thirty-five scholarly papers. After more than twenty-five years of research, he shifted his attention to the education of thousands of undergraduate students in Chemistry 1 and 2. He later developed and taught an advanced introductory sequence, Chemistry 11 and 12, which was popular with budding science majors. He had a reputation for knowing a great many of his students and for being readily available for private tutorials. His lifelong interest in chemistry was sparked at Michigan State University, where, as a doctoral student, he began investigating the properties of alkali metal solution in ammonia under the eminent chemist James L. Dye. He went on to study in Göttingen, Germany, in the laboratory of future Nobel Laureate Manfred Eigen. While there, he not only conducted groundbreaking studies about the kinetics of reactions of metal-ammonia solutions, but also met his future wife, Inge. “Bob’s most enduring legacy is that of a professor who exemplified everything good in the Tufts University undergraduate teaching tradition,” said School of Arts and Sciences Dean James Glaser. “He will be remembered by students as a demanding but fair teacher whose courses were routinely cited as the ones at Tufts where they learned the most.” In addition to his wife, Dewald leaves two children and grandchildren. 

     

  • Howard Saltsburg, a longtime faculty member in the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, on February 11, 2016. He received his Ph.D. in physical chemistry from Boston University in 1955. After working as a scientist in private industry and national laboratories, he was a professor of chemical engineering at the University of Rochester for more than twenty years. He came to Tufts as a research professor in 1998 and served as acting chair of chemical and biological engineering from 2001 to 2002. While at Tufts, he collaborated with Professor Maria Flytzani-Stephanopoulos and helped advise more than ten doctoral students. He is survived by his wife, Iris, and two children. If you want to write a remembrance of Howard, please send an email to chbe@tufts.edu, and the department will forward the responses to his family.